Knowledge Base - FAQ's

Tips on how to Pack, Travel and Shoot

  • Pack. Travel. Shoot.
    Use this reference guide to take you through the process of properly packing your gear, traveling with your gear, and ultimately finding the best solution for working out of your bag while shooting. It’s divided into three primary sections: Pack, Travel and Shoot.

    PackTravelShoot.pdf


Airport Travel Decisions

  • Airline Considerations

    Based on current world events, it is more important than ever for photographers to make informed travel decisions. These decisions include researching size and weight restrictions of their chosen airline prior to traveling, selecting the proper seat, arriving early at the airport, and making wise decisions about how to carry their photographic equipment. (For tips from pro photographers on how to get your gear through the airport and onto the plane, you can read more here, Traveling With Photo Gear.)

    We provide the information in this article so you can make the correct choice when selecting the equipment you’ll carry on board.

  • Overhead or underfoot?

    The Glass Taxi Gets You There Fast.

    The smaller the bag you take on the plane, the less mental stress you will experience. The Glass Taxi easily fits overhead or under the seat, which is a huge relief when traveling. Because of its round and tapered shape, it looks small and compact, but will hold up to a 500 f4 lens. Like all of our products, it does not look like a camera bag, which is an advantage when traveling.

    One travel strategy you may want to employ is to use the Glass Taxi for your large lens and then a shoulder bag for your SLR and other lenses. This gives the appearance that they are carrying less than you actually are.

    Click here for more information on the Glass Taxi shoulder bag/ backpack.


    The Airport Check In Under the Seat

    This medium size briefcase fits easily under an airline seat, even when there is an obstruction (note the electrical box on the left). Here is a comfort hint: Just after take off, move the briefcase directly under your legs and lean it up against your seat vertically. That allows you to stretch your legs out completely. Since many photographers like to access their laptop, papers, and books during the flight, the laptop case that ships with the Airport Check In is a very nice solution. You can store your briefcase overhead or under the seat in front of you and slip your laptop case into the front seat pocket for easy access.

    With its professional and businesslike design, and the Think Tank name on the front, strangers will not know that you have your valuable photographic accessories on the inside.

    Click here for more info on the Airport Check In briefcase.


     
    Airport Antidote in an International/ Large Plane Overhead Compartment

    Here are the Airport Antidote backpack and the Airport Check In briefcase in a large aircraft overhead bin. One challenge you can anticipate when traveling internationally or when using multiple flights to get to your destination is that your bag’s size and weight may be legal for one country or airplane and over the limit for the next. The good news is that this backpack will fit on almost all planes. If you are sick of having problems with the size of your backpack, this may be your Antidote. (Travel hint: Even though this bags easily fits in the overhead bin, it is still advised that you board the plane as early as possible when most overhead bins are still empty.) Click here for more info on the Airport Antidote backpack.

    Photo courtesy of Reed Hoffmann. To learn more about Reed, go to www.reedhoffmann.com.

     

      Airport Antidote In A Medium Size Plane Overhead Compartment

    This is the standard size of most overhead compartments. Notice the Airport Antidote still has plenty of room.

    If you are one of the last people to board, do not hesitate to put your backpack in the first available overhead space. There are no rules saying that you have to put it directly over your seat. There is nothing worse than getting to your seat only to find out there is no space and then have to struggle forward on the plane to find a vacant spot. While you will have no problems fitting this backpack under the seat in front of you, if you desire full legroom you may prefer storing it in an overhead bin. Click here for more information on the Airport Antidote backpack.

    Photo courtesy of Reed Hoffmann. To learn more about Reed, go to www.reedhoffmann.com.


    Airport Antidote In A Small Size Plane Overhead

    This is a great photo of the Airport Antidote in the overhead compartment of a very small plane. Even with the maximum height of these compartments being seven inches, the Airport Antidote still slides right in.

    It is a common experience among photographers about to board a small plane to be told that they have to check the bag at the door. If you fly on small planes, you definitely need a carrying solution that fits under the seat or overhead if you do not want to check it.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Antidote backpack.

    Photo courtesy of Reed Hoffmann. To learn more about Reed, go to www.reedhoffmann.com.


    Artificial Intelligence 15 Under the Seat

    The Artificial Intelligence 15 laptop case comes with the Airport Antidote and the Airport Acceleration backpacks. It fits easily into the front stretchable pocket when the compression zipper is closed. The compression zipper slider is self-locking, to keep the laptop case tight in the pocket.

    This feature has two important purposes:
    1. If you are questioned on the size or weight of the backpack, the Artificial Intelligence 15 can be immediately removed. Unlike with other photo backpacks, doing this will reduce the size of the bag.
    2. When you arrive at your seat, it is easy to pull the laptop bag out using the handle and temporarily store it on your seat while slipping the backpack into the overhead bin.

    There is also a Artificial Intelligence 17 inch version called the Artificial Intelligence 17 laptop case. It is designed to hold larger laptops. Click here for more info on the Artificial Intelligence 15 and Artificial Intelligence 17.

     


    Airport Acceleration In An International/ Large Plane Overhead Compartment

    The overhead compartments on some large planes are so large that the backpack can stored straight in and sideways to save space. (If you would like a good laugh while waiting for your plane to depart, watch all the crazy things people try to carry on—absolutely huge duffle bags, guitar cases, suitcase rollers that clearly exceed carry on by one full size. It will make you feel better about your carry on luggage, or at least make you laugh.)

    Don’t underestimate the power of a positive attitude and a smile when going through airports. If there is an issue with your bags’ size or weight, you are more likely to be successful in getting it on board if you are relaxed and friendly. Click here for more information on the Airport Acceleration backpack.

     

     

      Airport Acceleration In A Medium Size Plane Overhead

    In the vast majority of planes, this backpack will go straight into the overhead compartment without a problem, with or without the Artificial Intelligence 15 or Artificial Intelligence 17 laptop case in the front pocket. One nice feature on all of our backpacks is that the main compartment has zipper sliders with holes so a lock can be attached. If you leave it unattended or are concerned about people getting inside, you can lock the main compartment. You can also buy retractable security wire devices at luggage stores that can be used to lock your backpack to a stationary object. Our Airport Security roller has a wire built into it just for this purpose. Click here for more info on the Airport Acceleration backpack.

      Airport Acceleration In A Test Frame

    As you can see, this backpack, with the computer case removed from the front, easily fits inside airline test frames. (This particular test frame also weighs the bag at the same time.)

    This is a controversial subject because most airlines never ask customers to put their luggage inside a test frame. Some veteran photographers have never been asked to put their luggage in a test frame, despite having traveled for decades, while others have. What some have concluded is that the most important technique for getting your gear onto the plan is that your bag should “look” like it is the correct carry on size. This is because most people working at the check in counters usually do only a quick visual inspection at the check in counter. Click here for more information on the Airport Acceleration backpack.

     

      Airport International ROLLER In A Medium Sized Plane's Overhead Compartment
    The most important rule for storing your roller in an overhead bid is "get on the plane first!" Make sure your seat assignment lets you board in the first three groups so that you will be almost guaranteed space in the overhead compartments.

    When putting a roller in the overhead bin, remember to put the wheels facing out. The overhead bin’s lid is curved, allowing it to curve right around the feet and wheels and to close properly. Always use this technique, for it will save you much aggravation.

    Click here for more information on the Airport International roller.

      Airport International ROLLER Under the Seat In A Small Sized Plane


    Airport International ROLLER Under the Seat In A Small Sized Plane
    In an emergency situation this roller can fit under the seat in front of you, as pictured on this British Airways flight. Because the roller is only 8” deep, it will slide right under the seat (as long as there are no obstacles, like electrical boxes).

    Although it is preferable not to have anything under the seat, you will have peace of mind knowing that your gear Is safely stored near you should circumstances require it (especially when traveling internationally).

    Click here for more information on the Airport International roller.

     

      Airport Acceleration In A Test Frame

    As you can see, this backpack, with the computer case removed from the front, easily fits inside airline test frames. (This particular test frame also weighs the bag at the same time.)

    This is a controversial subject because most airlines never ask customers to put their luggage inside a test frame. Some veteran photographers have never been asked to put their luggage in a test frame, despite having traveled for decades, while others have. What some have concluded is that the most important technique for getting your gear onto the plan is that your bag should “look” like it is the correct carry on size. This is because most people working at the check in counters usually do only a quick visual inspection at the check in counter. Click here for more information on the Airport Acceleration backpack.

    Airport Addicted In An International/ Large Plane Overhead Compartment

    This is an interesting photo because the overhead bins on large planes are substantially larger than the airlines own stated carry on size. This backpack is 9” x 14” x 22”, the stated maximum size for many airlines, yet look how much extra space is in front and above the backpack.

    We have had photographers from around the world take this large size photography backpack on every type of plane, including very small planes, by asking the steward to put it in the closet. Because it does have a large capacity, you do need to be careful with the total weight if your preferred airline does weight checks. Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted backpack.

     

      Airport Addicted In A Medium Size Plane Overhead

    On most planes in North America, this backpack goes straight into the overhead without a problem.

    The Airport Addicted has its own dedicated laptop compartment. With this one backpack, many photographers can travel with just one piece of luggage. Before boarding the plane, you can remove the laptop case and carry it using the shoulder strap. When you get to your seat, you can put your laptop case on your seat and then put the backpack in the overhead. Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted backpack.

     

      Airport Addicted In A Medium Size Plane Overhead Compartment

    The size of the overhead compartments in some planes forces all rollers and backpacks to be put in sideways.

    When checking in at the ticket counter, some photographers debate whether to wear the backpack or to take it off and put it directly in front of their feet, using the check in counter as a visual barrier. When it is standing up on the floor, it is the same size as many rollers. Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted backpack.

     

      Airport Addicted Under the Seat In A Small Size Plane

    The clearance under the seat ranges from 8.5” to 10.5” (22 – 27 cm), although there are sometimes obstructions like electronic boxes.

    Although the Airport Addicted will fit under most seats, it is not ideal solution, especially if you need leg room. This photo was taken on a small regional CRJ plane that had no closet space. As was the case here, sometimes the steward will let you put it under seat. If for some reason they force you to check a backpack with gear, it is best to take your SLRs out and carrying them on your shoulder, since they are far more sensitive to damage than lenses. Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted backpack.

     

      Airport Addicted In A Test Frame

    The critical dimension for the test frames is the depth (usually 8” to 9”). If the airline states the carry on depth is nine inches, the backpack will most likely fit in the test frame. Many international airlines have a stated depth of eight inches for carry on. In that circumstance, it will not fit in the test frame.

    Please read the notes for the Airport Acceleration on Test Frames, because they are rarely employed by airlines. The most important suggestion is that your luggage should not “look” oversized. Keep in mind that because there is no international standard carry on size, there is usually an unspoken one inch leeway in dimensions. Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted backpack.

     

      Airport Security In A Medium Size Plane Overhead Compartment

    When putting a roller in the overhead bin, remember to put the wheels facing out. The reason for this is that the overhead bin’s lid is curved, and it will curve right around the feet and wheels and close properly. Always use this technique for it will save you much aggravation.

    Our roller is the same size as other 22” rollers made by Samsonite and other luggage companies. It is important to note that the airlines and the luggage companies measure the size of the bag only, excluding the additional length created by the wheels and the feet. Most overhead bins are actually designed to hold luggage up to 23.5” when put straight in. Click here for more information on the Airport Security roller.

     

      Airport Security In A Medium Size Plane Overhead Compartment

    Airport Security In A Medium Size Plane Overhead Compartment
    Some airlines force all rollers to be stored sideways, like in this photo. But as you can see, there is room to spare in front of the roller and on top.

    When boarding a plane with a full size roller, it is especially important to be in the first group of people. With backpacks like our Airport Antidote and Airport Acceleration, you can put them under the seat, if so required. But with a roller it is less likely the flight attendant will allow it to be put under the seat, even though it is possible. Many professional photographers travel so much that they simply forget to get an advantageous seat assignment, which can cause some challenges. Booking your seat early does make travel less complex. Click here for more information on the Airport Security roller.

     

      Airport Security Under the Seat In A Small Size Plane
    Here is visual proof the Airport Security will fit under the seat. As you can see, it is partially under the adjoining seat’s floor space, so the person next to you will have to be agreeable to the arrangement. You can also put it straight under, but then you will have minimal leg room (see the photo under Airport Addicted). Says photographer Chris Kavanagh, “I took these photos aboard an Air Canada Jazz Bombardier CRJ705 regional jet from Houston to Toronto. The overhead is not large enough to accommodate the Airport Security but there is ample room under the seat.” Photo courtesy of Chris Kavanagh. Click here for more information on the Airport Security roller.
     
  • What size bag should I take?

    Airport Check In – Medium Size Briefcase Holds Essentials

    The Airport Check In briefcase is an excellent travel complement to our backpacks. This rugged briefcase lets you transport your laptop, cords, cables, and other essential items safely from one location to the next.

    This medium-size briefcase comes with an attachable shoulder harness, which can be a lifesaver when you have to walk (or run!) long distances, such as from one terminal to another.

    As airlines increasingly enforce carry on bag weight limits, one strategy photographers employ is to use a smaller backpack—keeping it below the stated carry on weight and then putting all of their batteries, laptop, cords, cables, and paperwork into the briefcase so that each piece of luggage is under the weight limit. In fact, some photographers are removing the free Cable Management 50 that comes with the Airport Check In briefcase and putting even more photo gear into the briefcase’s front section.

    Click here for more info on the Airport Check In briefcase.


    Glass Taxi - Small Shoulder Bag or Backpack?

    The beauty of this product is that it looks small and holds a lot. When non-photographers looks at this bag, they would never know that it can hold up to a 500mm f4 lens (wow!). This is especially useful when trying to create the impression that you are traveling light.

    Some airlines, like KLM in Europe and Africa, have a carry on limit of 6 kg per bag (13.2 lbs). Most photographers moan when they hear that, considering that a large lens by itself can be 7 kg. With most airlines randomly checking passengers for weight, a shoulder bag like the Glass Taxi can help you create the perception that you are traveling light, even though it may be quite heavy. Click here for more info on the Glass Taxi shoulder bag/ briefcase.


    Accelerate Through Airports With the Airport Acceleration

    This backpack meets all international airline carry on requirements and will still hold large lenses and pro-size SLRs.

    Many photographers are concerned about carrying ALL of their gear on the plane. Since some airlines now check for compliance with maximum weight limits, the decision between bringing a roller and a backpack becomes critical. Most rollers are 10 to 13 lbs (4.5 to 6 kg) which, when packed with gear, can push you over the weight limit of certain airlines. The base weight of the Acceleration backpack can range from 3.4 to 7 lbs (1.5 – 3 kg) depending on how many dividers you use, the raincover, extra straps for a tripod, and other items that ship with the backpack. This means a photographer can save 4 to 9 pounds alone just by choosing to bring a backpack. Click here for more information on the Airport Acceleration backpack.


    Travel Around the World with the Airport International Roller

    Traveling internationally to multiple countries via several different airlines with different carry on requirements can be one of the most challenging situations for photographers. Visually, this roller “looks” small, meets all international carry on size requirements, and will not attract attention to yourself as “looking like a photographer.” And yet, it will still hold a 400 2.8 lens!

    Although this roller solves the carry on size problem faced by most large camera bags, photographers still need to be aware of weight requirements. Often, when fully loaded, it is possible to exceed stated carry on weight requirements. In those situations it may be best to pull out some gear (a body and lens) and wear it on your body, since items that are worn are not counted as carry on.

    Click here for more information on the Airport International roller.


    For Those Addicted to Airports

    At 9” x 14” x 22”, the Airport Addicted backpack is the largest carry on backpack allowed for many airlines (check your airline for its carry on requirements). This holds a huge amount of gear, including your laptop.

    From Asia to Europe to North and South America, we have had hundreds of photographers travel around the world with this backpack without few reported problems. That being said, when there have been problems getting this backpack on board it is often because the size of the plane or the destination. For example, in small commuter airplanes, like a regional CRJ, the Airport Addicted will not fit in the overhead compartment. Or, for example, on flights out of Africa, KLM enforces the 6 kg rule. Most issues photographers have concerning airline travel is not the size of the backpack, but the weight. So you do need to carefully choose which aircraft you fly and the airline’s size and weight restrictions. Click here for more info on the Airport Addicted backpack.


    Is Security An Issue For Your Gear?

    The Airport Security roller is actually the same size as our Airport Addicted backpack, except it has wheels and feet on the bottom. (Airlines and luggage companies measure the size of the bag excluding the additional length created by the wheels and feet.) The well built roller fits inside almost all aircraft overhead bins.

    This roller is also excellent for wedding and commercial photographers who travel to locations by car. Not only does it carry a ton of gear, but the ability to roll it saves your back. The security cable and locking mechanism are big bonuses when you have to leave it unattended!

    This is a photo of Vince Laforet at the airport. If you are concerned about carry on size, please read the notes on the Airport Addicted, since they are the same size. Click here for more info on the Airport Security roller.

    Photo courtesy of Vince Laforet. For more information, go to www.vincentlaforet.com.

       

Do you have some sample pictures of how to pack my gear?

  • How to configure your Glass Taxi backpack.

    The Glass Taxi Interior – Pro-size SLR with 70-200 2.8

    This can be worn as a shoulder bag or as a backpack. It comes with many dividers and other accessories so that you can tailor it to fit your equipment.

    This is one of the few shoulder bags/ backpacks on the market that can actually hold a pro-size SLR with a 70-200 2.8 attached and with the hood in position to shoot. At the same time it can also hold essential lenses like a 24-70 2.8, a 16-35 2.8 wide angle, and a prime lens like an 85 1.8. Like a taxi, this bag will get you through traffic unscathed to your destination. Click here for more information on the Glass Taxi.


    The Glass Taxi Interior – Pro-size SLR Mounted To A 300 2.8

    The Glass Taxi comes with two accessories that are important for large lenses:

    1. Padded Foam Ring – As lens hoods vary in size, the removable foam ring that comes with the bag attaches to the bottom, decreasing the diameter. That means that if your hood is smaller, like a 300 2.8, it secures the lens in the bottom of the bag.
    2. Padded Foam Collar – There is a collar that mounts to the back interior that wraps around the lens just under the SLR. This positions the camera very securely inside of the bag.

    Click here for more information on the Glass Taxi.

      The Glass Taxi Interior – Holds Up To A 500mm f4

    This photo actually shows a 400 2.8 lens, but it will hold a 500mm f4. You can see the strap of the Padded Foam Collar across the top of the lens to secure it in place.

    The Glass Taxi is compatible with the Pro Speed Belt, which greatly expands your options. While the Glass Taxi is being worn as a backpack with the Pro Speed Belt, the backpack can be removed while keeping the Pro Speed Belt around your waist. This means that should you be walking and suddenly need the gear in the backpack, you can simply take off the Glass Taxi while leaving the Pro Speed Belt on. Click here for more information on the Glass Taxi.

       
  • Packing your gear in the Airport collection.

    The Airport Antidote Interior

    What is absolutely groundbreaking about this backpack is its small size and excellent capacity. Because it is 6.5” deep, it will hold pro-size SLRs and a complete complement of gear. In this photo it contains the following:

    Pro-size DSLR, 100 – 400 (same size as the 70-200), 17-40 wide angle, 100 macro, 85 1.8 prime, a medium zoom, as well as the Pixel Pocket Rocket, a strobe, charger for the camera batteries, charger for AA batteries, and an off shoe cord.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Antidote.


    The Airport Antidote Interior –300 2.8

    As depicted in this photo by Reed Hoffman, a 300 2.8 will easily fit into the Airport Antidote. This approach is becoming more popular since photographers are trying to reduce the size and weight of their bags. The basic concept Reed employs is to remove all the dividers and instead protect each individual item inside of its own bag or in a wrap, and then place them inside of the backpack in the desired layout. There is a photo of the Airport Acceleration backpack with Modular Component Set inserted for reference. Important Note: To save weight and for convenience, and to make double use of Modular Component Set, Reed removes the dividers and puts his gear in our Modulus components.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Antidote. Photo courtesy of Reed Hoffmann.

    To learn more about Reed, go to www.reedhoffmann.com.

    The Airport Antidote Interior--400 2.8

    This backpack will hold most 400 2.8 lenses up to 6.75” in diameter, which includes both Nikon and Canon that are currently being sold. The old Canon 400’s have a 8” diameter hood, which will not fit correctly.

    Click here for more info on the Airport Antidote.

    Important note about this photo: To save weight and for convenience, Reed removes the dividers and puts his gear in our Modular Component Set and “wraps” them. Please read the previous explanation as to why there are no dividers inside of the bag.

    Photo courtesy of Reed Hoffmann. To learn more about Reed, go to www.reedhoffmann.com.

      The Airport Acceleration Interior—300 2.8

    For photojournalists shooting daily news, the Airport Acceleration will hold a complete travel kit, including:

    2 DSLR’s, a 300 2.8, a 70 -200 2.8, a 24-70 2.8, a 16-35 2.8, two strobes, a Pixel Pocket Rocket, and other accessories. The SLR can either be mounted to a lens or put in separately.

    The rectangular shape is essential for carrying this amount of gear. Plus, it will not be recognized as a photo backpack, and meets all international carry on requirements.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Acceleration.

      The Airport Acceleration Interior –400 2.8

    While this photo shows a 400 2.8 lens, it will hold up to a 500mm f4 lens. This is a nice set up for sports photography because it will hold the essentials – a 400 2.8, a 70-200 2.8, a 16-35 2.8 wide angle, two DSLR’s, and batteries.

    For nature photographers, it allows you to carry big lenses in a relatively small package that meets international carry on requirements, and will fit either in the overhead or under the seat in all planes.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Acceleration.

     
    The Airport Acceleration Interior—Moduler Components

    Experienced photographers keep separate their “transportation” bag solutions from their actual “working” bag solutions. They use our backpacks, roller, and briefcase to safely transport their gear from one location to the next. Inside of these bags they store their working gear, such as a Modular Component Set fully loaded. Then, when they arrive at their destination, they use their backpack or roller as a “portable office,” while donning their modular system or beltpack for the actual shoot.

    In this photo the SLR equipment has been put into Modular Component Set and then laid flat on the bottom. The advantage to this is that they can be removed and put onto a Pro Speed Belt for actual shooting. In fact, some photographers simply put their belt system with the components attached into the bag, so all they have to do is pull it out and go.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Acceleration.

      The Airport International ROLLER Interior—300 2.8

    The Airport International will hold a complete travel kit, including: two DSLR’s, a 300 2.8, a 70 -200 2.8, a 24-70 2.8, a 16-35 2.8, two strobes, a Pixel Pocket Rocket, and other accessories. The SLR can either be mounted to a lens or put in separately.

    This product utilizes our “Patent Pending” technology that makes the bottom of the roller deeper than the top, allowing for more gear to be stored inside.

    This roller meets all international carry on size requirements while holding a considerable amount of gear.

    Click here for more information on the Airport International roller.

      The Airport International ROLLER Interior –400 2.8

    This photo shows a compact kit for shooting sports:

    Two DSLR’s, a 400 2.8 lens with the hood, a 16-35 wide angle lens, a 70-200 2.8, three extra batteries, and room for more. We suggest our Airport Check In briefcase to hold all of your cords, cables, and other accessories.

    It can also hold a 500 f4 lens, but it will not hold a 600 mm lens. For that, you need our Airport Security roller.

    Click here for more information on the Airport International roller.

      The Airport Addicted Interior—Nikon Equipment

    When deciding whether to bring your backpack or roller, it is important to remember that a backpack allows for the maximum amount of equipment to be carried onto a plane. The reason for this is that handle and wheel systems on rollers take up space inside the bag.

    In this photo you can see both a 300 2.8 and a 70 – 200 2.8. Although it cannot be seen, there is a rear laptop compartment that will hold most 15” laptops. This backpack is also excellent for nature photographers out in the field who do not want a big, bulky, overpadded backpack.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted.

    Photo courtesy of Brian Cassey, Australia.

      The Airport Addicted Interior—Gear + Clothing

    For some reason we photographers often forget that we do not have to fill our bags entirely with gear. This photo shows how the Airport Addicted’s upper compartment can be loaded with photo gear and the lower part with clothing.

    Many photographers like to travel light, with the least amount of gear possible, especially for a weekend assignment. Buying a photo backpack and only partially filling it with electronics and the rest with clothing is a smart alternative to lugging two separate bags. Plus, the Airport Addicted holds a laptop. Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted.

      The Airport Addicted Interior—400 2.8

    Here is a set up for shooting sports, with a 400 2.8 lens. As the backpack comes with so many dividers to organize their gear, most photographers only use about one third of them. The middle vertical divider and the top horizontal divider are stiffened to give the backpack a firm structure. If you plan to load it full, it is best to keep these two dividers in the backpack.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted.

      The Airport Addicted Interior—Photo + Video

    This is an interesting photo of photo and video equipment combined.

    As multimedia becomes more important for Web content, the ability to carry photo, audio, and video equipment will be needed. Blocking off the bottom section with the stiffened divider creates a very deep bottom well 8.5” deep. Check the size of your video camera in relation to our interior dimensions. Some of the parts on this video camera had to be removed to get it in the bottom section.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Addicted.

    Photo courtesy of Eric Lian.

      The Airport Security interior—Wedding Set Up

    Here is a set up from a wedding photographer. Amazingly enough, the two lenses at the bottom of the case are a 200 1.8 and a 70 -200 2.8 both sitting VERTICALY inside of the case. Our patent pending design gives the roller an extra deep bottom area that allows this. Also in the roller is a 85 mm 1.2, a 16- 35 2.8, a 24 -70 2.8, and much more.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Security.

      The Airport Security interior—400 2.8

    Here is a sports photography set up with a 400 2.8, three DSLR’s, three other lenses, five batteries, and two flashes. If your bag is overweight and you are flying on an airline that checks bag weight, consider “wearing” your gear in your pockets and on your shoulders, since those are not considered carry on items. For more information on this topic, go to Travelling With Your Photo Gear.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Security.

    Photo courtesy of Jack Gruber. To learn more about Jack, go to www.jackgruber.com.

      The Airport Security interior—600 mm lens.

    Here is proof that a 600 mm lens will fit into an Airport Security roller (it will also fit into our Airport Addicted backpack). In fact, in this photo a teleconverter is also attached to the lens, making it longer.

    For wildlife photographers a 600mm lens can be an essential piece of equipment. Traditionally, these large lenses have had to be included in checked baggage. Our roller is one of the very few (and maybe only) that will hold a 600 mm lens and still fits the required the 9” x 14” x 22 size for carry-on.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Security.

    Photo courtesy of Ken Blye.

      The Airport Security Interior—Moduler Components

    Here is an interesting photo combining Modular Component Set and traditional dividers.

    Photographer Taylor Jones uses the Trim Changers (shown at the top) to separate and protect his gear with the minimum amount of bulk. In addition, he is using “wraps” to protect other equipment. Usually the first time you pack your bag it can take hours to figure out the right combination. But, after that you will rarely have to change the dividers, so it is worth the effort.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Security.

    Photo courtesy of Taylor Jones. To learn more about Taylor, go to www.taylorjonesimages.com.

      The Airport Security Interior—Moduler Components

    Here are all the contents removed from the photo above.

    Click here for more information on the Airport Security.

    Photo courtesy of Taylor Jones. To learn more about Taylor, go to www.taylorjonesimages.com.


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